Talk Soon. Talk Often FAQs

Talk Soon. Talk Often FAQs

Talk soon talk often (and listen too)

It is never too early for parents to start talking with their children about sexual matters: growing up, being a boy, being a girl, where babies come from, how the body changes in puberty, periods, love and closeness, personal values, relationships, contraception and safe sex, sexuality and sexual expression.

Offer lots of little conversations over time from toddlerhood to 'teenhood', rather than one 'big talk'.

Talk soon. Talk Often, DHHS, 2013

Research shows that children whose parents easily communicate with their
children about sexuality, and who receive good sexuality education at school, are more likely to delay their first experience of sexual intercourse and sexual relationships. They are also  less likely to have an unplanned pregnancy or a sexually transmitted infection.

Young people tell us parents and family members are one of their main sources of information about relationships and sex, but good communication between parents and children needs two-way discussion rather than lectures or 'one big talk'.

What's available to help parents talk soon talk often

Many parents feel nervous talking with their children or teenagers about sex. Many worry about what information to share when. Often parents feel more comfortable if they have guidance.

Take advantage of teachable moments. Use prompts from TV, magazines, experiences with friends, music and the Internet to start conversations and 'hypotheticals'.

Talk soon. Talk Often, DHHS, 2013

Talk soon. Talk often. was published by the
Department of Health and Human Services
(Tasmania) for Tasmanian parents. It helps parents by giving them information they need to talk confidently with their children and teenagers about growing up,
with information appropriate for each developmental stage.

It also includes a list of relevant services, websites and books that may be useful, and suggestions of how to deal with relatively new challenges – like what do you do if your teenager is posting photographs on social media sites of her/himself naked or if someone is sending your child inappropriate text messages.

How the book's content was developed

Talk soon. Talk often was originally developed in 2008 by the Government of Western Australia (Department of Health) with input from parents. The Government of Western Australia gave permission for the resource to be adapted and produced for Tasmanian use.

To develop the resource, parents of primary and secondary school students across Western Australia were asked about their current approach to talking with their children about sexual matters and the kind of support they wanted. This information was then used to develop Talk Soon. Talk Often.

Does talking to kids about sex encourage them to become sexually active?

As a parent you are the most important educator for your child in relation to relationships and sexuality education.

It's never too early to start talking with children about sexual matters. And it's never too late to start.

Talk soon. Talk Often, DHHS, 2013

Research shows children whose parents easily communicate with them, informally and regularly,
about sexuality, and who receive good sexuality education at school, are more likely to delay sexual relationships and their first experience of sexual intercourse.

They are also less likely to have an unplanned pregnancy or a sexually transmitted infection.

You can help your child feel able to talk openly about sexual matters by being a 'tellable' parent – make yourself available, unshockable and listen.

Talk a little and talk often, find out what your kids need to know.

How to get a copy

Talk soon. Talk often. is a free online resource for Tasmanian parents.

Download your free copy from www.dhhs.tas.gov.au/pophealth/talk_soon_talk_often